Lori Senecal Demystifying the Role of Branding

Have you ever wondered how blithe celebrities like Lindsay Lohan, Britney Spears, Miley Cyrus, and more lethal ones like Amy Winehouse dangerously toy with a career that made them so famous? Is it possible for such women to continually enjoy success at the expense of destructive behavior openly displayed to the public, and at the same time manage to garner lucrative contracts as brand ambassadors? Or raise millions of dollars to start up celebrity brands like the Britney line of perfumes?

Companies and brands can borrow a leaf from the outwardly ignorant young stars and the value of their branding strategies. These celebrities convert every day acts like of buying coffee or shopping for hiking boots into a preferred, hyped-up celebrity media moment. What do natural branding secrets these clueless celebrities posse? Below is a list of key lessons:

1. Consumers adore great comebacks. The only formula to create extra publicity is a makeover. Nintendo was thought as a dead game by hard-core gamers after Sony PlayStation stole the show, but Nintendo reinvented with a massive comeback with the Wii game.

2. Company downsizing as a strategy to draw massive attention. The Olsen Twins transformed to “It Girls” when they drastically lost weight. It can work for brands too; the Blackberry Pearl unveiled smaller smarter and buzzier phones.

3. Get caught with an extra sexy name. It worked perfect for Brangelina and never mind that the partnership never lasted. Brands like Nike merged with Apple to form Nike +, and it stole a Grand Prix at Cannes.

4. Adopt a cause. Celebrity philanthropy has gone wild with following corporate suit. Everyone is suddenly obligated to save the world, and clothe refugees. Corporations like BP have rebranded using eco-initiatives as an alternative to going green with the rest of the world.

5. Develop an icon. Mature brands can transform themselves by finding a symbol that illuminates their brands, like Geico and the gecko.

Lori Senecal

Lori Senecal is CP+B’s Global CEO; she oversees the company’s growth and manages its nine international offices. Lori’s leadership and focus on talent led Advertising Age to award CP+B as the Creativity Innovators of the Year and named Lori as one of the Agency Executives to Watch in 2016. She also featured on Adweek’s Power List, among top leaders in media, marketing, and tech.

ABOUT 3%

3% represents all U.S. women Creative Directors in a world where women influence 80% of consumer spending and 60% of social media presence. Through professional development, content, and community awareness, the organization has raised female Creative Directors to 11% while providing agencies with ways to support female leadership and creative talent. The movement includes a 2-day annual conference, one-day conference in cities all over the world, agency consulting programs, a Certification Program, an online community, a student scholarship fund, a blog and much more. https://www.c-span.org/person/?lorisenecal